Historically, the onset of PTSD followed a life event defined as “out of the range of normal human..

Historically, the onset of PTSD followed a life event
defined as “out of the range of normal human experience” (combat, concentration
camp imprisonment, natural disasters, assault, or rape). More recent diagnostic
criteria have expanded the list of “eligible” events to include many more human
experiences, some of which are common (unexpected death of a loved one, serious
illness such as cancer in oneself). This expansion in the manner of contact
with the traumatic event is known as conceptual bracket creep. Should events
that will occur to everyone—death of a loved one, serious illness—be
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Historically, the onset of PTSD followed a life event
defined as “out of the range of normal human experience” (combat, concentration
camp imprisonment, natural disasters, assault, or rape). More recent diagnostic
criteria have expanded the list of “eligible” events to include many more human
experiences, some of which are common (unexpected death of a loved one, serious
illness such as cancer in oneself). This expansion in the manner of contact
with the traumatic event is known as conceptual bracket creep. Should events
that will occur to everyone—death of a loved one, serious illness—be considered
a traumatic event or just part of life? What are the implications for suggesting
that life itself can create PTSD?

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