Psychologists have found that we each have a happiness “set point” that seems relatively resistant..

Psychologists have found that we each have a happiness “set
point” that seems relatively resistant to major change. Yet our moods certainly
change from day-to-day and sometimes fluctuate within the same day, too. Over
the next week, record your mood on a 10-point-scale (1 = extremely unhappy to
10 = extremely happy) each day at these eight times:

a. when you wake up in the morning;

b. when you are leaving your home in the morning for school
or work;

c. when you are having lunch;

d. when you are talking to a family member;

e. when you visiting the Internet, such as a social
networking
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Psychologists have found that we each have a happiness “set
point” that seems relatively resistant to major change. Yet our moods certainly
change from day-to-day and sometimes fluctuate within the same day, too. Over
the next week, record your mood on a 10-point-scale (1 = extremely unhappy to
10 = extremely happy) each day at these eight times:

a. when you wake up in the morning;

b. when you are leaving your home in the morning for school
or work;

c. when you are having lunch;

d. when you are talking to a family member;

e. when you visiting the Internet, such as a social
networking Web site;

f. when you are having dinner;

g. when you are watching television or listening to music in
the evening;

h. when you are getting ready for sleep.

After one week, you will have recorded a total of 56
entries. (a) What was your average number in total? Does it surprise you? Why
or why not? (b) What was your average number for each of these eight
activities? Do any of these numbers surprise you? Why or why not? (c) What was
the range of your numbers, from lowest to highest? (d) From this activity, what
insights have you gained about your moods and their relative stability or
changeability in terms of the various times and activities of your day?

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