Responding to a Hostage Situation Once a recent 14-hour hostage standoff finally ended, a mother and

Responding to a Hostage Situation

Once a recent 14-hour hostage standoff finally ended, a
mother and young child were killed by the hostage taker (the estranged father),
one LEO was killed in the gun fire exchange, and two other LEOs sustained
non–life-threatening gunshot injuries. One officer, who was shot in the back,
is expected to be paralyzed. EMS professionals were on the scene since the
beginning of the police intervention, anticipating transport of any injured
persons to the hospital. As part of the CISM team connected with the police
department, describe your action plan for
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Responding to a Hostage Situation

Once a recent 14-hour hostage standoff finally ended, a
mother and young child were killed by the hostage taker (the estranged father),
one LEO was killed in the gun fire exchange, and two other LEOs sustained
non–life-threatening gunshot injuries. One officer, who was shot in the back,
is expected to be paralyzed. EMS professionals were on the scene since the
beginning of the police intervention, anticipating transport of any injured
persons to the hospital. As part of the CISM team connected with the police
department, describe your action plan for intervening in this situation.

Discussion Questions

1. What groups would you assess as being a priority and how
would you proceed?

2. If the timeframe for the standoff lasted longer than
expected, how would the intervention change and how would you implement PFA,
CISM, or MANERS during the standoff?

3. What unique stressors would the injured officers or
family members of the officer’s experience that may need to be addressed? What
resources would you think are important to have available for them?

4. What intervention would you integrate if, during a
debriefing, a first responder terminated prior to you getting a comprehensive
assessment?

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