What criteria need to be met for a judge or jury to find an offender “not guilty by reason of insanity”?

“Mentally Ill or Insane”If you ask the average person on the street you will find that many people see the terms mentally ill and insane as interchangeable terms.However, you will find out this week that being declared mentally ill and being declared insane are often two very different things.
– How does a decree of insanity differ from a diagnosis of mentally ill?– How is insanity defined in the legal system?– What criteria need to be met for a judge or jury to find an offender “not guilty by reason of insanity”?– In recent years an additional plea has come into play – “guilty but mentally ill”. How does this differ from a plea of “not guilty by reason of insanity”?– What is your personal view of these two pleas?You may find the following sources helpful in replying to this week’s Discussion Questions:Feuerstein, S., Fortunati, F., Morgan, C. A., Coric, V., Temporini, H., & Southwick, S. (2005). The Insanity Defense, Psychiatry, 2(9), 24-25, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2993532/Donohue, A., Arya, V., Fitch, L., & Hammen, D. (2008). Legal Insanity: Assessment of the Inability to Refrain, Psychiatry, 5(3): 58–66, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2710106/Gomez, M. (2008). Developments in the Law: The Law of Mental Illness, Harvard Law Review, https://harvardlawreview.org/wp-content/uploads/pdfs/Volume_121_DEVO_08.pdf